Ala Champ
 
00:00/

KHALIK ALLAH

The NYC-Based Film-Maker Presents His Second Feature Film, BLACK MOTHER

NOBU CAFÉ AT NOBU HOTEL, LONDON

A Modern Take On The Traditional British Afternoon Tea

MAREFUMI KOMURA

The Art Of Subtraction at 'Big Ship' at The Mass, Harajuku

Tomoo Gokita ‘PEEKABOO’

Abstract Figures & Monochromatic Brushstrokes At Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery

Dream House By Marina Abramović

An Experiential Overnight Artwork In Japan's Mountainous Niigata Region

Enoura Observatory

Embedded In Nature: A Hilltop Art Facility By Japanese Artist Hiroshi Sugimoto

Summer Solstice Observation Gallery © Odawara Art Foundatio

The highly-anticipated permanent space of famed artist Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Odawara Art Foundation has finally found a site to call home. After ten years in the making, artist Hiroshi Sugimoto’s new Odawara Art Foundation acts as a diverse art facility consisting of a gallery space, performance stages and tea house. Situated on a hilltop slope in the local area of Nebukawa in Odawara in Japan’s Kagawa Prefecture, the Enoura Observatory sits amongst the area’s local citrus groves and mandarin farms facing the expansive Sagami Bay.

Known as one of Japan’s most famed photographers, Hiroshi Sugimoto’s artworks extend to sculpture, installation, and architecture in an ongoing partnership with architect Tomoyuki Sakakida of New Material Research Laboratory, seeing their previous designs together include the Izu Photo Museum in Shizuoka and MOA (Museum of Art) in Atami, Japan.

Here, their design for the Enoura Observatory sees the use of technical glass and unpolished Oya stone imbed with historical fossils, sourced from the Tochigi prefecture. The same stone is said to have been used for the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.

The tip of the Summer Solstice Observation Gallery © Odawara Art Foundation

Walking around the expansive site, each space is interconnected with the play of light and shadows. Sugimoto designed the same to respond to the natural movement of the sun, with the Summer Solstice Observation Gallery and the 70-metre Winter Solstice Observation Tunnel framing and illuminating the sunrise and sunset from Sagami Bay.

The outdoor performance stage was created using technical optical glass, the same type of glass used for camera lenses aimed to reflect the various light refractions on the stage’s cut surfaces. On a bright day, the stage can be naturally illuminated by the sun. Here, Bunraku and other traditional Japanese theatre performances can be enjoyed whilst facing the spectacular ocean views from the “floating” glass stage and deck supported by hinoki wood and a kakezukuri framework (a traditional frame most commonly seen at traditional temples such as Kiyomizu-dera temple in Kyoto and the Monjudo hall on Mount Mitoku in Tottori).

Inside the Summer Solstice Gallery, designed with Oya stone and glass © Joanna Kawecki

In the Summer Solstice Observatory Gallery, the space is designed as a gallery and observation deck with seven of Sugimoto’s earliest and famed ‘Seascape’ works found, including the very first photograph in the series from 1980. The seven works are presented in a narrow hallway, with a wall of oya stone on one side and an opposing wall comprised of 37 large glass panes connected side by side with no support – for a completely column-free space. As a visually light structure, the cantilevered roof channels sunlight, as Sugimoto explains; “On the morning of the summer solstice, the sun’s rays rise from the sea and take several minutes to make their way down the full length of this space.”

Seascape, Sea of Japan, Oki (1987 / gelatin silver print) by Hiroshi Sugimoto © Courtesy of Gallery Koyanagi
Exterior of the Summer Solstice Observation Gallery © Joanna Kawecki

As quite the destination, Enoura Observatory can be reached via taxi or bus just 10 minutes from the local train station. Visitor numbers are stagnated throughout the day, ensuring that each guest has enough personal space and time to enjoy the area.

Due to the spectacular location, it’s hard not to feel an emotional connection to the design and the surrounding landscape, undoubtedly experiential in any season.

Optical Glass Stage © Joanna Kawecki
Winter Solstice Observation Tunnel and Optical Glass Stage © Joanna Kawecki
Inside the Winter Solstice Observation Tunnel, looking onto Sagami Bay © Joanna Kawecki

Enoura Observatory 
Odawara Art Foundation
362-1 Enoura, Odawara,
Kanagawa, Japan

Winter Solstice Observation Tunnel and Optical Glass Stage © Odawara Art Foundation
Winter Solstice Observation Tunnel © Odawara Art Foundation
February, 2018