Tokyo’s Best Interiors & Spaces —Ala Champ
Ala Champ
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THE GOLDEN LAND: JOAN DIDION’S PERSONAL GEOGRAPHY

Writer Magdalena Lane's Dedication to the Literary Innovator and Cultural Icon

The Complexity and Wonderment of Astrophotography

Photographer Rami Ammoun Captures The Vastness of the Night Sky Through An Unimaginably Intricate & Layered Process

THE FUTURO HOUSE

In Japan, 1960's Architectural Utopianism That Still Stands To This Day

KEIGA KEIGA

Surplus Value Center: Between Real and Virtual Worlds in Clothing & Wearable Products

SATOSHI KONDO’S ISSEY MIYAKE SS22

"Down Below in the Deep, Thrives a World full of Life, Vivid and Beautiful.”

X-RAY FLOWERS

Tokyo-Based AMKK's Latest Radical Exploration Of The World Of Flowers

THE BEST OF SPRING/SUMMER 22

Champ Fashion Editor-at-Large Ciana Mai Selects Her Top 5 Collections This Season

YUICHIRO NODA

The Tokyo-based Photographer On Capturing The Essence of Water, Light and Air — "Something What Cannot Be Seen"

NOGUCHI, A TRUE POLYMATH

The Barbican in London Presents A Concise Look at the Pioneering Artist

KENTA UMEMOTO

Paris-based Photographer on "Finding The Value in Changes, Attempting to Capture The Beauty of Imperfection in Daily Life."

INI ARCHIBONG

“An Object Should Communicate An Idea to the People Coming in Contact With It. It’s a Three-Dimensional Standing Piece of Poetry.”

A-POC ABLE ISSEY MIYAKE / KYOTO

Designer Tokujin Yoshioka Renovates A 200-Year-Old Machiya, Balancing Heritage With Innovation

TOM SACHS: SPACE PROGRAM

Karl Hab Photographs the Rare Earths Launch in Hamburg

MOGANA

Unique To The Rest: A Kyoto Boutique Hotel with Sleek, Design Minimalism And Contemporary Charm

MACq 01

Waterfront Views, Natural Tasmanian Timbers and Modern Design Completes Hobart's Most Conveniently-Situated Luxury Hotel

ABSORBED IN THOUGHT

Artist Lee Ufan Presents New Works at Pace Gallery East Hampton

Tokyo’s Best Interiors & Spaces

We Highlight Some Of Tokyo's Most Fascinating Contemporary Architecture & Design

March, 2018
HOMME PLISSÉ ISSEY MIYAKE, Daikanyama, Japan | Designed by Naoto Fukasawa, Tokyo

HOMME PLISSÉ ISSEY MIYAKE: Found in the backstreets of Daikanyama, a striking two-storey concrete and light-filled space holds an interior designed by Naoto Fukasawa. Simplicity is key here, with beams and fixtures presenting the pleated garments as if they are “floating in space”. More here.

Anjin, T-Site Daikanyama, Tokyo ⓒ Michael Holmes

Anjin, T-Site’s dimly lit café, bar and restaurant space located in their central building, is perhaps their most succinct articulation of the T-Site experience. With its leather lounges and impressive archive of cult print titles such as EsquireSelf Service and Brutus – which are all available to peruse freely in the lounge – the space invokes a rare sense of openness, allowing it to be come a genuine part of the city and to forge a unique connection with its customers. More here.

Nikunotoriko by Ryoji Iedokoro, Tokyo

Over a spectacular two-story space, one Japanese yakiniku restaurant in Roppongi stands out from the rest from its striking, considered design. Tokyo-based architect Ryoji Iedokoro has created a unique restaurant interior design for Yakiniku Nikunotoriko, located on a corner site in the heart of the Roppongi area. The corner site provides passers by with a transparent look at the restaurant interior from outdoors, with both of its two floors completely visible as if split in half. From a distance, it’s clear to see the design concept, that focussed on the origins of human (connected with the primal diet of meat). More here.

Sahsya Kanetanaka, Omotesando, Tokyo, designed by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Hidden away on the second floor of a commercial building on Tokyo’s bustling Omotesando Dori, a modernised traditional Japanese cafe and restaurant Sahsya Kanetanaka sits in the heart of Omotesando, heralding a minimalist design by artist Hiroshi Sugimoto. White, curves found in the seating are juxtaposed against sharp, elongated tables in a light-filled and open interior facing an outside garden showcasing each of Japan’s seasons. A contemplative space, with attention to detail and simplicity at it’s finest.

Koffee Mameya by Studio 14SD, Tokyo

Found deep in the backstreets between Harajuku and Omotesando lies Koffee Mameya, the reincarnation of owner Eichii Kunimoto and its previous predecessor sibling Omotesando KoffeeFound in the same location, the new box-like design champions the contemporary contrast of concrete and wood, again helmed by design studio 14SD and head designer Yosuke Hayashi. More here.

Blue Bottle, Nakameguro, designed by Jo Nagasaka / Schemata

One of the greatest things we admire about Tokyo-based architect Jo Nagasaka and his firm Schemata, is his use of common and sustainable materials and simplistic, restrained design. Nothing is exaggerated, and every element has been designed to serve a purpose and function. Here, at Blue Bottle Nakameguro cafe, roastery and training space. A glass facade allows plenty of natural light throughout the 3-floor renovated building, whilst “establishing a visual relationship of “see and be seen” so that people become aware of each other’s presence wherever they are in the space.”

Kayaba Coffee, by Yuko Nagayama, Tokyo

Absolutely unlike anywhere else, Kayaba Coffee located in East Tokyo’s Yanaka neighbourhood is also found by the renowned Scai The Bathhouse Gallery, created by the same visionary owner Masami Shiraishi. Originally built in 1916, KAYABA Coffee is a classic Japanese kissaten, renovated by architect Yuko Nagayama who retained the coffeehouses’ original charm. More here.

AM Project, Harajuku, Tokyo

Located in an unassuming residential apartment building in Tokyo’s Harajuku area, AM Project is a destination in itself as you enter through its dark narrow walkway, into a black-walled interior with levelled walkway. In a very minimalist interior darkened by minimal lighting, the black wooden walkway is almost floating, providing a heightened view of a usual gallery experience. As an independent gallery space, it presents the works of Japan’s legendary underground photographers; find exhibitions of Nobuyoshi Araki, Daido Moriyama, Kazumi Kurigami, and Sakiko Nomura in a fascinating, darkened interior. Here, enter the world of Araki and his peers. More here.

Aesop, Nakameguro, designed by Simplicity (Shinichiro Ogata)

With a spacious entrance and interior, Aesop continues it’s run of graciously spectacular interiors with it’s Nakameguro outpost, designed by Shinichiro Ogata of Simplicity. Inspired by the design of Japanese homes from the 1950’s, find tile details and copper fittings with custom-made Japanese (teak) wood cupboards that, depending on your position, provide an illusion of hidden products. Clever contemporary design with a nod to cultural history.

March, 2018