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PARKHOTEL MONDSCHEIN

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FUFU KYOTO

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HOMME PLISSÉ ISSEY MIYAKE SS23

As Ever, The Joy Of Movement & Ease of Pleats Prevails

Serpentine Pavilion 2022

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BRUT-AL

Argentinian-Australian Designer Alexander Lotersztain's Ode to Brutalism

Serpentine Pavilions 2000-2021

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PURE FORM

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101 SPRING STREET NEW YORK

Visitors Allowed: The late Artist Donald Judd's Extraordinary Home and Studio

January, 2018
101 Spring Street, New York, 5th Floor. Photo: Joshua White, Judd Foundation Archives, Image © Judd Foundation

It was 1968 when artist Donald Judd purchased 101 Spring Street, a 5-story cast-iron building in SoHo, New York for $68,000. The area was still rough and undesirable at this time, but Judd saw the potential and character in the neighbourhood and building.

Designed by architect Nicholas Whyte and constructed in 1870, to this day 101 Spring Street is the only intact, single-use cast-iron building remaining in SoHo. The former garment factory was the first building Judd bought, utilising it as a residence and studio.

101 Spring Street, New York, 2nd Floor. Photo: Charlie Rubin, Judd Foundation Licensed by ARS

8,500 feet of space over 5 floors and 2 basements, the building housed around 1,000 works of art and design collected or exchanged with friends. A Marcel Duchamp hangs in the hallway of the top floor, whilst Ad Reinhardt’s ‘Red Painting’ graces the second floor. The ground floor was often used for exhibitions, community and activist meetings, and performances, with the first floor holding art world dinner parties.

Judd hosted social gatherings because of his genuine curiosity for new ideas and exchange of knowledge and insight with his friends and contemporaries, such as Carl Andre, Vito Acconci, Dan Flavin, Barnett Newman, Claes Oldenberg and Coosje van Bruggen.

101 Spring Street, New York, 3rd Floor. Photo: Charlie Rubin, Judd Foundation Licensed by ARS

Judd’s innovative approach to the interiors of his house, saw artworks installed in unconventional places, with his concept of “permanent installation” whereby the placement of a work was critical to understanding the work itself.

In 2013, a $23 million renovation to restore the property and allow for safe visitation was completed. With Judd’s passing in 1994, his children Rainer and Flavin, oversaw the restoration with the guidance of instructions written in Judd’s 1989 essay ‘101 Spring Street’.

101 Spring Street, New York, 4th Floor. Photo: Charlie Rubin, Judd Foundation Licensed by ARS

Judd explains, “My requirements were that the building be useful for living and working and more importantly, more definitely, be a space in which to install work of mine and of others. At first I thought the building large, but now I think it small; it didn’t hold much work after all. I spent a great deal of time placing the art and a great deal designing the renovation in accordance”.

101 Spring Street is open for guided tours by appointment only, with Judd Foundation ensuring works on view remain as they were installed by Judd prior to his death, including furniture and possessions left as Judd had left them whilst living there. A one-of-a-kind insightful experience into the lives of one of the greatest artists of our time.

101 Spring Street, New York, 1st Floor, 1974. Barbara Quinn © Barbara Quinn | Whitney Independent Study Program Seminar with artist Donald Judd at his studio in 1974. On Judd’s left is Ron Clark and on his right is artist Julian Schnabel.
101 Spring Street, New York, 3rd Floor Library. Photo: Mauricio Alejo, Judd Foundation Licensed by ARS

101 Spring Street – Judd Foundation
101 Spring Street,
New York, 10012  

By Appointment Only

#champ_newyork

January, 2018