Donald Judd —Ala Champ
Ala Champ
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Donald Judd

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March, 2020
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1986. Douglas fir plywood and orange Plexiglas; six units, each 39 3⁄8 × 39 3⁄8 × 29 1⁄2″ (100 × 100 × 75 cm), with 19 11/16″ (50 cm) intervals. Overall: 98½ × 157 5⁄8 × 29½” (250 × 400 × 75 cm). Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale‑on‑Hudson, New York © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Chris Kendall

Artist Donald Judd (1928–1994) and his lifetime of work remains incomparable until this day. His particular artistic vocabulary remains original and continues to provide a lot more to discover, twenty-six years after his death.

In the 1960s, Judd was among a generation of artists who aimed to dispose of illusion, narrative, and metaphorical content within their artistic practice. Instead Judd explored three dimensional works, simultaneously incorporating industrial working methods and materials. As he described, his aim was to investigate “real space”.

Opening today, the Museum of Modern Art in New York presents a full scale retrospective of Judd’s work stemming from sculpture and painting, to drawing and prints.

The first retrospective of the artists work in the US for over three decades, 70 works have been strenuously acquired from private collections in the US and abroad. Organised by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Yasmil Raymond, former Associate Curator; Tamar Margalit, Curatorial Assistant; and Erica Cooke, Research Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA, the exhibition’s density highlights the in-depth research by the curatorial team. The works are presented in chronological order, highlighting Judd’s genius and practice both methodical and unpredictable.

An incredibly creative thinker, Judd was a prolific art critic and essayist and was not only active in the fields of architecture and design, but remained deeply committed to democratic and environmental causes. The exhibition ‘reading room’ presents his key writings along with definitive published books on his work.

The retrospective presents Judd’s methodology and materials. Hollow boxes, stacks and progressions made with metals and plastics by commercial fabricators were part of Judd’s vocabulary, with the artist later going on to use plywood also. From works made in his home-studio in New York to his practise in Marfa Texas, the exhibition also highlights site-specific pieces and those that were eventually fabricated in Europe (in the last decade of the artists life). An invaluable timeline is shown into Judd’s work production, execution and final presentation.

Donald Judd. Untitled. 1989. Clear anodized aluminum with amber acrylic sheet, 39 3/8 × 78 3/4 × 78 3/4″ (100 × 200 × 200 cm). Glenstone Museum, Potomac, Maryland © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1976–77. Stainless steel, Twenty-one units, each 4 × 27 × 23″ (10.2 × 68.6 × 58.4 cm), with 13.5″ (34.3 cm) intervals. Overall: 4 × 108 × 230″ (10.2 × 274.3 × 584.2 cm). Collection of the Des Moines Art Center. Purchased with funds from the Coffin Fine Arts Trust; Nathan Emory Coffin © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Rich Sanders
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1989. Enameled aluminum, 11 13/16 × 70 7/8 × 11 13/16″ (30 × 180 × 30 cm). Private collection, Belgium © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo Courtesy Galerie Greta Meert
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1960. Oil on canvas, 70 × 47 7/8″ (177.8 × 121.6 cm). National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1967. Green lacquer on galvanized iron; twelve units, each 9 x 40 x 31″ (22.8 x 101.6 x 78.7 cm), installed vertically with 9″ (22.8 cm) intervals. The Museum of Modern Art, Helen Acheson Bequest (by exchange) and gift of Joseph Helman © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Judd (March 1st, 2020 - July 11th, 2020)
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1968. Stainless steel and amber Plexiglas; six units, each 34 × 34 × 34″ (86.4 × 86.4 × 86.4 cm), with 8″ (20.3 cm) intervals. Overall: 34 × 244 × 34″ (86.4 × 619.8 × 86.4 cm). Layton Art Collection Inc., Purchase, at the Milwaukee Art Museum © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © John R. Glembin
Installation view of Judd, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 1–July 11, 2020. Photo by Jonathan Muzikar © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art.
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1970. Purple lacquer on aluminum and cadmium red light enamel on cold‑rolled steel, 8 1/4 × 161 × 8″ (21 × 408.9 × 20.3 cm). Kunstmuseum Basel © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Donald Judd. Untitled. 1963. Cadmium red light oil on wood with iron pipe, 22 1/8 × 45 3/8 × 30 1/2″ (56.2 × 115.3 × 77.5 cm). Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Joseph H. Hirshhorn Purchase Fund © 2020 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Alex Jamison

Judd

The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, Floor Six

Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53 Street, Manhattan

The exhibition runs from March 1–July 11, 2020

#champ_newyork

March, 2020