Ala Champ
 
00:00/

PARKHOTEL MONDSCHEIN

A Rich Cultural History Combined with a Refined Design Aesthetic at this Modern Luxe Hotel

FUFU KYOTO

An Intimate Luxury Hotel that Entwines Traditional Japanese Dining, Architecture and Hospitality with Modern Elegance

JACQUEMUS PARIS

A Pure Interior Led By Playfulness and Surprise

The Gdańsk Shakespeare Theatre

The Charred-Brick 'Black Box' Presenting The Beauty Of Theatre & Performance

GAIA

British Artist Luke Jerram’s Explores The Vastness of Our Earth

Honouring ISSEY MIYAKE

The Legacy Remains: Merging Art & Fashion, East & West, Tradition & Technical Innovation

UNITED PLACES BOTANIC GARDENS

Local and Luxurious, A Melbourne Boutique Hotel That Gets It Right

Naoshima Ryokan ROKA

Designed by Okayama-based studio Nottuo, a New Modern Stay on Japan’s ‘Art Island’

Restaurang ÄNG

NORM Architects Creates A Light-Filled Glasshouse For The Michelin-Starred Restaurant

JAPANESE CRAFTSMANSHIP: BAMBOO WEAVING

In The Quiet Backstreets Of Kyoto's South Higashiya, Find A Master Craftsman

HOMME PLISSÉ ISSEY MIYAKE SS23

As Ever, The Joy Of Movement & Ease of Pleats Prevails

Serpentine Pavilion 2022

Artist Theaster Gates Designs the 21st Pavilion

BRUT-AL

Argentinian-Australian Designer Alexander Lotersztain's Ode to Brutalism

Serpentine Pavilions 2000-2021

A Champ Online Retrospective Of Two Decades of The Radical Architectural Event

PURE FORM

The Art Gallery of South Australia Presents Japan's Avant-Garde Ceramics

KABIRA & KANGRI

The Beauty Of Indian Textile Craftsmanship In ISSEY MIYAKE Sub-Brand HaaT's SS22 Collection

ODE TO OSAKA

Architect Sverre Fehn's Unrealised 'Breathing Pavilion' Reimagined Four Decades Later

May, 2022
Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Annar Bjørgli

In 1970, Norwegian architect Sverre Fehn submitted a “breathing space” temporary pavilion design for the Scandinavian Pavilion at the 1970 Osaka Expo, with the competition entry only to be left unbuilt and unrealised. Fast forward forty-five years later to 2015, with architects Manthey Kula commissioned by The National Museum’s Architecture department in Oslo, and invited to reinterpret and realise Fehn’s original concept (of two inflatable forms, in which fresh air stand in contrast to Osaka’s heavily pollution) in a new contemporary installation.

As rather an ode in honour of the original concept, Manthey Kula’s structure was inspired by Fehn’s breathing space intention to reflect a pure organism that would expand and contract, breathing with its visitors. The new installation was comprised of a timber airlock and an inflated, moving textile structure (manufactured by Luft & Laune, who specialise in creation, design and production of sophisticated inflatable objects) and incorporated a new steel bench where visitors could sit and feel the space “breathe”.  With no objects on display, the emphasis was on the space itself and a sensuous experience, just as Fehn had intended.

Coincidentally and most suitably, it was held within the museum designed by Fehn himself in 2008 — a brutalist space of Rationalist concrete, wood and glass construction — essentially creating a Sverre Fehn pavilion within a pavilion. Whilst Fehn died in 2009, he remains one of Norway’s most prominent post-war architects, noting, “Our future depends on the conditions in which our decidedly unfashionable sky finds itself”.

Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Annar Bjørgli
Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Annar Bjørgli / Manthey Kula
Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Annar Bjørgli
Sverre Fehn, pavilion model. Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Sverre Fehn / Nasjonalmuseet
Sverre Fehn, testing. Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Sverre Fehn / Nasjonalmuseet
Ode to Osaka. Sverre Fehn, Scandinavian Pavilion, Osaka 1970 (sketch). Photo: Teigens Fotoatelier / Nasjonalmuseet
Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Annar Bjørgli
Ode to Osaka, 2015. Photo: Nasjonalmuseet / Manthey Kula

Text: Joanna Kawecki
Images: as credited

May, 2022