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CRETO DI BURRI

One Of The Largest Land Artworks In The World Found In The Outskirts of Palermo In Italy

August, 2018
Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII

Creto di Burri, also known as the Crack of Burri or “The Great Crack” by Umbrian artist Alberto Burri is one of the largest land artworks in the world.

Creto Di Burri is an artwork by Alberto Burri found in the original city of Gibellina, Sicily, an Italian town which was historically destroyed by a devastating earthquake, the Belice Earthquake in 1968. Burri had originally started to create an artwork in the city in 1984, but after being moved by the devastation of the town in 1968, he offered to create an artwork covering the entirety of the destroyed town.

Burri enlisted the help of the Italian military and the construction team who was also working on the Gibellina Nuova, to cover the rubble of the destroyed town and compacting the loose fragments, enclosing them in metal nets and pouring white cement over the entire site. The focus was to maintain the site’s urban footprint and history. The full site measurements see the artwork cross (150 cm × 35000 cm × 28000 cm) in size and across approximately 85,000 square metres. The artwork originally began construction in 1984 (later then in 1968) and was left in an unfinished state in 1989, finally seeing completion now 30 years later.

While the artwork remains at the original Gibellina site, the new city of Gibellina known as Gibellina Nuova, has since being rebuilt and is found about 20km from the city’s original location. Champ Editor Monique Kawecki visited the extraordinary Creto di Burri during this years Manifesta 12, this year held in the Sicilian city of Palermo, Italy.

Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII
Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII
A close-up of the concrete structure. Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII
Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII
Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII
Creto Di Burri, Gibellina, Italy © Monique Kawecki / RICOH GRII
August, 2018